Biography

Kee Chan, PhD

Kee Chan, PhD

Health Economist Research Investigator
Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System
Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR)
Bedford, MA and Boston, MA

Assistant Professor of Health Sciences
Director of Genomics and Comparative Effectiveness
Boston University
635 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA  02215

 

Contact Information:
Email:  keechanphd@gmail.com
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/keechan
Follow me on Twitter: @keechanphd.

Education:

PhD, Yale University
MS, University of California, San Diego
BS, University of California, San Diego

Awards:
American Public Health Association (APHA) Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Young Professional Award (2013)

Eric Mood New Professional Award by Yale Alumni Association (2013)

Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Grant Award – Using Social Media Tools to Enhance Public Health Education and Service Learning (2012).

Research Interest:
Medical Decision Making
Infectious Diseases (HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis)
Public Health Genomics

About Kee Chan, PhD:

A PhD graduate from Yale University and a former research fellow at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Kee Chan, PhD, is an expert on developing mathematical models to determine time-saving and cost-effective strategies in improving public health. Dr. Kee Chan is an Assistant Professor of Health Sciences at Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at Boston University. Dr. Chan also serves as an adjunct research investigator at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), where she conducts health economic analyses on several projects at the VA hospital in Bedford, Massachusetts.  Dr. Chan collaborates with researchers across the U.S. and internationally on projects.  As the Director of the Genomics and Decision Sciences group at Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at Boston University, Dr. Chan researches the cost-effectiveness analysis of new medication for hepatitis C infections and the impact of expansion routine testing for HIV in the U.S.

Her significant contribution to society includes her development of a screening test to detect for T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in newborns, in which the absence of TRECs is indicative of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) (Chan and Puck 2005).  With screening, babies with SCID are identified early and can be saved by bone marrow treatment and live a healthy life.  As of 2012, twelves states in the U.S. have implemented newborn screening for SCID using the TREC test.  Dr. Chan is a member of the Genetic Alliance Consumer Task Force, and together, they will increase the awareness of genetic testing in newborn screening programs.

Dr. Chan has led workshops and written papers on professional development in several national forums. Published in the highly-acclaimed The Chronicle of Higher Education, her article on “Translating the 7 Effective Habits for the Classroom” provides a faculty guide on developing and teaching new academic courses. Dr. Chan is also an advisor on careers in science and public health. She has written papers on career advice for scientists, and her paper on “Bridging Your Research Into Public Health” describes effective tips on navigating through the transition (Chan, Science 2012).  Dr. Chan is a co-chair of a maternal and child health committee of the Association Public Health Association (APHA) and a member of the Society of Medical Decision Making (SMDM).  She is an active member of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) where she has moderated workshops on negotiation, financial management, and book reviews. She is on the organizing committee of YaleWomen at Boston and helps organize events for Yale alumni.

Since 2007, at Boston University, Dr. Chan teaches courses in genomics and public health.   Dr. Chan is the author of an upcoming book on understanding your genes for healthy living.

Visit Dr. Chan’s publications at Google Scholar Citations

updated on June 20, 2014